Coat of Arms: RevisedThis piece is inspired by Nigerian writer Chinamanda Ngozi Adichie’s speech entitled “The Danger of a Single Story”. In this speech she talks about how if we hear only one story about a person or country, we as a society risk misunderstanding; that no place has a single story, or everyone and every place is diverse and has layers. I wanted to create something that would fully represent my province, because being from Prince Edward Island I feel the rest of Canada and the World only truly know one or two “stories” of PEI.

I decided to look at our current Coat of Arms and revise it. I wanted to showcase the diversity of the Island, and show how everyone who has touched the Island has shaped it.

Starting at the bottom, the water and fish serve as representation for the body of water surrounding PEI - The water makes us who we are. The turtle comes from the Mi’kmaq creation story, which tells of the Great Spirit spreading soil on the shell of a turtle and forming the land. The sharp trees in the background stand for the poverty, substance abuse, and government corruption, which currently plague the Island. The three floating landmasses are for the Island itself having three counties: Queens, Prince, and Kings. On the first landmass you see fireflies, which symbolize the Acadian people and those lost during the Expulsion of the Acadians (1755-1764). 

On the second landmass, you see two foxes who symbolize the fox farming industry which helped PEI’s economy to explode. I chose red foxes because PEI currently has a large population of red/orange foxes. The foxes are chasing a blue bird, representing Prince Edward Island’s provincial bird, the blue jay. 

On the top mound you see large spruce trees, which represent massive trees that at one time toward over the Island. European settlers cut down these trees to support the shipbuilding industry - this helped many Islanders thrive.

The crown does represent the monarchy, which is still very present on PEI today. The crown is also a tribute to Prince Edward Island’s Veterans, who fought in the Boer Wars, World War I, World War II, and Korea. Also, at one time PEI had many different militia regiments; their pins would often feature a crown.

The flock of crows symbolizes the ones who fly to Charlottetown’s Victoria Park in the evenings from surrounding areas. In this piece there are 74 crows, which stand for the 74 incorporated municipalities on PEI, they also represent the folklore, which is present in every community on the Island.

The Latin term “Parva Sub Ingenti” means “Small under the protection of the Great” which is PEI’s motto. The term “Epekwitk”(Abegweit) is the Mi’kmaq name for PEI meaning, “Cradle on the Waves”.

One of my favourite teachers in school was Mrs. Gavin, my Grade Nine History teacher. The reason I love her so much is she spoke to me in a language I could understand; she didn’t tell me facts, she told me stories. I wanted to create a piece that could be used to teach people about PEI and let everyone know we all have many stories to tell, like Mrs. Gavin told me.

Coat of Arms: Revised

This piece is inspired by Nigerian writer Chinamanda Ngozi Adichie’s speech entitled “The Danger of a Single Story”. In this speech she talks about how if we hear only one story about a person or country, we as a society risk misunderstanding; that no place has a single story, or everyone and every place is diverse and has layers. I wanted to create something that would fully represent my province, because being from Prince Edward Island I feel the rest of Canada and the World only truly know one or two “stories” of PEI.

I decided to look at our current Coat of Arms and revise it. I wanted to showcase the diversity of the Island, and show how everyone who has touched the Island has shaped it.

Starting at the bottom, the water and fish serve as representation for the body of water surrounding PEI - The water makes us who we are. The turtle comes from the Mi’kmaq creation story, which tells of the Great Spirit spreading soil on the shell of a turtle and forming the land. The sharp trees in the background stand for the poverty, substance abuse, and government corruption, which currently plague the Island. The three floating landmasses are for the Island itself having three counties: Queens, Prince, and Kings. On the first landmass you see fireflies, which symbolize the Acadian people and those lost during the Expulsion of the Acadians (1755-1764). 

On the second landmass, you see two foxes who symbolize the fox farming industry which helped PEI’s economy to explode. I chose red foxes because PEI currently has a large population of red/orange foxes. The foxes are chasing a blue bird, representing Prince Edward Island’s provincial bird, the blue jay. 

On the top mound you see large spruce trees, which represent massive trees that at one time toward over the Island. European settlers cut down these trees to support the shipbuilding industry - this helped many Islanders thrive.

The crown does represent the monarchy, which is still very present on PEI today. The crown is also a tribute to Prince Edward Island’s Veterans, who fought in the Boer Wars, World War I, World War II, and Korea. Also, at one time PEI had many different militia regiments; their pins would often feature a crown.

The flock of crows symbolizes the ones who fly to Charlottetown’s Victoria Park in the evenings from surrounding areas. In this piece there are 74 crows, which stand for the 74 incorporated municipalities on PEI, they also represent the folklore, which is present in every community on the Island.

The Latin term “Parva Sub Ingenti” means “Small under the protection of the Great” which is PEI’s motto. The term “Epekwitk”(Abegweit) is the Mi’kmaq name for PEI meaning, “Cradle on the Waves”.

One of my favourite teachers in school was Mrs. Gavin, my Grade Nine History teacher. The reason I love her so much is she spoke to me in a language I could understand; she didn’t tell me facts, she told me stories. I wanted to create a piece that could be used to teach people about PEI and let everyone know we all have many stories to tell, like Mrs. Gavin told me.

my portion of my classes piece in our end of year art show! 

zinewhocares:

by amy wells

zinewhocares:

by amy wells

Close up!!

Close up!!

T-Shirt Design for an upcoming music festival.

T-Shirt Design for an upcoming music festival.

I created this pattern for my friend Christian’s twitter background. I really like how it turned out! 

I created this pattern for my friend Christian’s twitter background. I really like how it turned out! 

Lavanderia is nice on it’s own but those swoooooshes.

Lavanderia is nice on it’s own but those swoooooshes.

Food & Warmth 2013 at the Guild Poster Design 

Food & Warmth 2013 at the Guild 
Poster Design
 

~*~ CONTEST!!!!~*Hey Everyone,I have a design on threadless up for scoring and I would be so grateful if you could score my design 5 to let threadless know you think it should be printedhttp://www.threadless.com/threadless/an-obstacle-is-often-a-stepping-stone/Please Like AND reblog this photo  for your chance to win a poster featuring this design! :) if you could comment letting me know you’ve voted that would be awesome!Contest ends December 15 2013…start sharing and happy holidays! if you’re wondering what threadless is:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Threadless

~*~ CONTEST!!!!~*

Hey Everyone,
I have a design on threadless up for scoring and I would be so grateful if you could score my design 5 to let threadless know you think it should be printed

http://www.threadless.com/threadless/an-obstacle-is-often-a-stepping-stone/

Please Like AND reblog this photo  for your chance to win a poster featuring this design! :) if you could comment letting me know you’ve voted that would be awesome!

Contest ends December 15 2013…start sharing and happy holidays! 


if you’re wondering what threadless is:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Threadless

revised version after critique

revised version after critique

An Obstacle is Often a Stepping Stone05.12.13 (originally posted on my personal blog) 

An Obstacle is Often a Stepping Stone
05.12.13 
(originally posted on my personal blog) 

(Source: amyandthebunnymen)

Coffee Type No.111/25/13 

Coffee Type No.1
11/25/13 

Coffee Type No.211/27/13 

Coffee Type No.2
11/27/13